Warp

Boss
  • Content count

    354
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    37

Warp last won the day on July 5

Warp had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

169 The Beast

1 Follower

About Warp

  • Rank
    Winning Streak

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I have been on the better side of a bad beat (ie. I'm the one beating a clearly superior hand with my weaker hand) many times. Some of them the kind that's surely utterly frustrating to the other guy. You know, the kind where the other guy has like a pair of kings or aces in hand, and I get a straight on the river, for instance. Of course this has happened rarely, and me losing with a weaker hand is much, much more common. But every time I beat someone badly due to sheer luck, I always remember to think "well, sometimes it happens in this direction after all."
  2. That's a fair question. People just don't play here the same they would play when real money is involved. If your only poker experience is Prominence Poker, would it cause you to use all the wrong tactics in a real-life game where people are playing for real money? For example, one really bad habit that you easily learn at PP is to always limp pre-flop. That often works here (because everybody else also limps), but might not be such a good tactic in an actual cash game.
  3. One time there were only two players left (me and somebody else), and our stacks were about the same. I had a connection problem. When I was able to reconnect, I had less than a big blind left. I proceeded to win. If there were any sort of messaging system, I would have written that other guy "it's not as easy when the other player is actually there, is it?" I can only imagine how frustrated that other guy must have been.
  4. So nobody in the know is going to explain this?
  5. Mythic rare.
  6. Well, they wouldn't be rare if they happened all the time, now would they?
  7. But it doesn't make any sense. I folded, so I didn't end with anything. Even if it looks at what I would have ended with if I hadn't folded, shouldn't it be looking at all my cards?
  8. Will you be able to keep that promise for at least 24 hours?
  9. I honestly cannot understand how my message about you looking like The Joker can be interpreted as anything else than humor. You said "my avatars will always be a representation of myself". That forum picture is an avatar. My forum avatar doesn't represent myself. I'm not a Leatherback Baloth.
  10. I have always considered these visual "tells" brilliant in this game. I don't know of any other online poker game that has them. (Granted, I haven't tried or seen many, but still.) You shouldn't rush to the action in a real-life poker game, and likewise you shouldn't do that here either. Moreover, you can try to bluff people with a wrong "tell". Just pretend that you are going to check early in the round... but when your turn comes, cancel that action and raise instead! Or the other way around: Pretend that you are going to raise, and perhaps some people might fold in response, even though in reality you are just going to check. How many other online poker games do you know where you can do this kind of psychological game? I think it's brilliant.
  11. Masquerade? For most players (including me), in pretty much all games the playable character is not me. It doesn't represent me. I don't consider it as an image of myself. The playable character is an avatar through which I interact with the game. A puppet. A tool. Or, if there is any sort of even vague emotional attachment to the character (which is not the case with PP, because there is no story and no character development, but sometimes can be with other games, at least in my case), a sort of "fictional friend", or "fictional companion" through which I play the game. The playable character is not a projection of the player in almost any game where it's not customizable. If you play a Mario game, do you think "I am Mario, I look like this, this is me"? Or do you think "I control this fictional character named Mario, who looks like that"? You are not that character, it doesn't represent you. You control that character, and interact with the environment of the game through it. When there is character customization in some games, most people do not try to make it look as close to themselves as possible. Why would they? This is an avatar, a fantasy character, a fictional character that the player controls. This is not the person him or herself. As mentioned, if there is any sort of emotional attachment to the character, you can think of as some sort of fictional imaginary "companion" or "friend", not as a representation of yourself. Many people will make this imaginary character as cool as possible. Some people might make it ridiculous-looking. Others will make it look attractive, someone that they could imagine being good friends, or even attracted to. Some may try to make it as sensual as possible for titillation. There are many possible ways to approach character creation, but extremely rarely do people think of this customizable character as representing themselves. They do not think "this is me, this represents me, how I truly am, or what I would want to be". I'm a man, and I have a female playable character in PP. I do not "identify" as a female, nor do I think that this playable character is me, or what I want to be, or how I "identify" myself. It's an avatar, a fictional character, completely separate from me. It's not a projection of myself. If you allow me to be a bit crude, the playable character is female mostly because of the old joke adage "if I have to look at an ass for hours on end, it better be a beautiful ass". As crude as it might sound, I prefer looking at a beautiful female character than an ugly dude. There's nothing more to it. I do understand if some male players prefer creating male characters (who may look "cool", or "tough", or whatever), or female players creating female characters. A few of them might even really want the playable character to look as much as themselves as possible. Obviously that's fine. There is no correct answer to this. It's personal preference.
  12. And you felt the need to make a post about it. Normally when people get bored of a particular game, they just stop playing it and move to something else. They seldom feel the need to announce it to the world. Feels a bit of a drama queen thing to do.
  13. Some people have a cognitive misconception about probabilities and how they work. For example, with 5 best cards being chosen from a group of 7 cards, the probability of a flush is about 1 in 32. Meaning that, on average, there will be a flush approximately once every 32 rounds. Many people, thus, get the misconception that if they see an unusually high amount of flushes, like for example 3 flushes during 10 rounds, or 5 flushes in 20 rounds, or something like that, then there's something wrong. Clearly if the odds are 1 in 32, having 3 in 10 rounds is an indication of the randomness being completely skewed! That's like 1 in 3, not 1 in 32! But this is nothing but a variant of the gambler's fallacy. Just because on average (over thousands and thousands of rounds) the probability is 1 in 32, that doesn't mean that it's impossible to get some streaks of flushes, where in a relatively short amount of rounds you get tons of flushes. Every round is its own event, and doesn't care what has happened in previous rounds. Just because tossing a coin gives you a 50% chance of getting heads, that doesn't mean that getting 10 heads in a row is indicative of something being wrong. (It's not even hard to get 10 heads in a row, if you keep tossing for long enough. There are even genuine videos of this, of people doing that. They keep tossing a coin for a couple of hundred times, videoing themselves, and when they get the 10-toss streak, they show that segment.) Sometimes it, likewise, happens in the other direction: You might go for 200 rounds with only one or two flushes appearing. That's also completely normal. Yet nobody pays attention to that. We only pay attention when it happens unusually often.