Welcome to The Forum

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads and etc.

DPack

Question about position

Recommended Posts

So I've been watching the WSOP 2016 final table, and they talk a lot about position, but after 23 episodes, I'm still not entirely sure what that means, or how it affects the game.

Could one of you pros kindly explain it, or point me towards where I can read up on it?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the main factors in position is the threat of a reraise from those who act after you.  You can face this reraise preflop and/or after the flop.

In a tournament the main factor is stack size and the threat of being busted out of the tournament. The shorter your stack size is the more you want to steal blinds without seeing flops, but at the same time if you get reraised (3 bet)  you are not deep enough to see  the flop.  So it becomes more of a raise/3 bet (villain reraises your opening raise)/4 bet shove(original raiser pops the reraising villian) game.

Being out of position you have a tough time knowing if your opponents in later position have a real hand or are just making a move on you.

In a ring game the goal is to win stacks after the flop, since stacks are deeper hands that wouldn't be raised in earlier position in a tourney (due to short stacks) can now be raised.  Hands like pocket 2's-7's, 54 suited, 65 suited, 10J off, 98  ect.   One can also flat more with any playable range and try to hit the flop and win some chips.  BUT, in a ring game those in later position can try to play back against that looser opening range with a 3 bet or reraise.  The goal being to win the chips right there or have momentum heading into the flop.

In a ring game depending on reraise size it becomes more of how much does he got left, how much can I win if I hit, what is his range here?  One has to weigh whether its profitable to call/4 bet the villian/ or fold.  Side tip:  If you open 65 suited for 3x, then its good to open AA for 3x too to balance range.   That way if villain 3 bets  your opening raise when you have AA, well you can 4 bet him and get the money in and stack.  This helps protect your opening raises some as villain is thinking "is this 67 suited or pocket Aces?   should I risk 3 betting him?"

In any game, tourney or ring, if the opponents who act after you are passive  you are in good shape, as you have more freedom to act and less threat of being 3 bet.  You're in a nice and soft game.  If  your opponents who act after you are more aggressive then you will have to be sharp and ready to fight back in key spots, or know when to get out of the way (an under valued fundamental).

The later position you have, the greater advantage you have, as you have more options available to you.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just learning this myself, though I've always understood just from experience that it's better to be in late position, that way you're not caught in the middle if you call a bet and then someone after you re-raises. Also, if the board doesn't look promising for anybody and everyone is checking and you're in late/last position, you can bet and win the pot because most likely, everyone will fold. Occasionally you get someone who slow plays their monster cards. I really hate that because there's no reason why they should still be checking by that point.

Edited by Miss Ameryka
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's generally agreed that position is the "most" important thing in poker, but you'll find on Prominence (if you watch closely enough) that most players do NOT understand position.  Which is fine.  That just means you want to be in position more often when you make plays here.  

When you play with players who do understand position, you can use their knowledge to your advantage even when out of position.  Raising big out of the small blind against a player who understands position will generally be translated as you having a monster hand since that is the "worst" position.  So this might be a good place to bluff, particularly if that player is on the "tightish" side and limped.  But I wouldn't try these tactics against the general random player on PP.  In fact, it's never a good idea to bluff a calling station ever.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On November 11, 2016 at 9:33 AM, Miss Ameryka said:

 Occasionally you get someone who slow plays their monster cards. I really hate that because there's no reason why they should still be checking by that point.

Slow playing is risky, as you are giving your opponent a chance to catch cards cheap.  But it is also a good strategy to maximize the size of the pot for you to win.  They slowly because they are afraid you will fold, but might bet if given a chance.  But slow playing cards with so many bad players really is risky.  

What you have to think of each hand is as a story you are telling.  Against better players, as Bedside points out, you can count on the other players knowing what your hand range could be based on you riot actions.  They will ferret out your hand if your "story" doesn't make sense.  But against bad players, you can't assume that they have any understanding off what your hand range could be, so your bluffs aren't respected, and slow playing is just giving dunks cheap cards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having position refers to acting after them.  When you're oop out of position,  you act before they do.  Position give you information, information is how you make chippies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.